Debt Ceiling

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RECENT DEVELOPMENTS:

  • Sept 25, 2017:  President Trump said earlier this month, “”For many years, people have been talking about getting rid of [the] debt ceiling altogether, and there are a lot of good reasons to do that.” Three Senate Democrats introduced legislation last week to abolish the debt ceiling, but support from the GOP majority is unlikely, with many seeing it as periodic leverage to push through budget reform measures.
  • Sept. 7, 2017:  House Conservatives oppose Trump debt ceiling deal with Democrats (debt ceiling/Harvey aid/continuing resolution)
  • Sept. 7, 2017: Trump, Schumer agree to pursue plan to repeal the debt ceiling
  • Aug. 2017:  BPC Debt Limit Analysis August 2017
  • Aug. 7, 2017:  Column by Ed Kleinbard: “The Debt Ceiling Crisis is Real”
  • July 28, 2017:  Treasury Secretary Mnuchin in letter to Congress states it “is critical that Congress act to increase the nation’s borrowing authority by September 29, 2017.”  July 28 Treasury Letter to Congress on Debt Ceiling
  • June 29, 2017:  “If the debt limit remains unchanged, CBO projects that the Treasury will likely run out of cash in early to mid-October—leading to delays of payments for the government’s programs and activities, a default on its debt obligations, or both.”  CBO Federal Debt Ceiling June 2017
  • In the Balanced Budget Act of 2015, Congress suspended the debt ceiling through March 15, 2017, at which time the statutory limit was automatically re-set at the current debt level.
  • Treasury can take extraordinary measures that allow it to continue borrowing for several months before hitting the new debt ceiling, including:
    • Suspending investments of the Thrift Savings Plan’s G Fund;
    • Suspending investments of the Exchange Stabilization Fund;
    • Suspending the issuance of new securities to the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund (CSRDF) and Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits Fund (PSRHBF);
    • Redeeming, in advance, securities held by the CSRDF and the PSRHBF in amounts equal in value to benefit payments due in the near future;
    • Suspending issuance of new State and Local Government Series (SLGS) securities and savings bonds; and
    • Exchanging Federal Financing Bank securities, which do not count against the debt limit, for an equal amount of Treasury securities held by the CSRDF.
  • March 7, 2017:  CBO released a report on the debt ceiling stating, “If the current suspension is not extended or a higher debt limit is not legislated before March 16, the Treasury will, from that date forward, have no room to borrow under standard operating procedures. Therefore, to avoid breaching the ceiling, the Treasury would begin taking the extraordinary measures that would allow it to continue to borrow for a limited time. Continued use of those measures, along with regular cash inflows, should allow the Treasury to finance the government’s activities for the next several months without an increase in the debt ceiling.” (emphasis added)  The CBO report provides a useful description of the extraordinary measures that can be taken to delay the next debt ceiling increase, as well as useful information on federal cash flows and Treasury auctions.

Reports and Background on the Debt Ceiling: